Sant Harchand Singh Longowal has placed his signature alongside that of Mr. Rajiv Gandhi, the Prime Minister of India, on a document that claims to resolve the four year old ‘stalemate’ between the Sikhs and the Hindus. Santji says he has signed on behalf of a majority of Sikhs living in India. Mr. Gandhi is said to have proclaimed that the said document begins a new phase of building national unity.

While Santji has shown susceptibility to everything but reason, Mr. Gandhi has proved that he had learnt his lessons well from his mother and his grandfather. He needs to be congratulated for having persuaded the Sikhs to betray themselves all over again. The document had to be acclaimed in India because it shifts the Sikh Hindu conflict to a division amongst the Sikhs themselves. It is a document which forces the Sikhs to permit their pockets to be picked and then thank the perpetrator of the ‘event.

Take a few examples. Chandigarh, built as the capital of Punjab with Punjabi capital, now being exchanged for negotiated pieces of land much larger in area than Chandigarh itself is being hailed as a concession. The Government of India’s acceptance of liability for the safety and survival of its citizens is being hailed as a concession to Sikhs. Authorities promise that they will make efforts to rehabilitate all Sikh soldiers who mutinied in protest at the invasion of the Golden Temple. That is recognition, by the Government, of a right enshrined in the Constitution of India. It is again being hailed as a concession to the Sikhs. It appears the English word CONCESSION has very different meanings in South Asia.

But the Sikh nation is thankful to Santji. He has proved to all the self-respecting and thinking Sikhs living all over the world, including India, the need to safeguard the integrity of the notion as well as the nation of Sikhs. To that end, the Khalistan Council has initiated high-level talks with a delegation from Ecuador to explore further possibilities of support, in various forums of the world, for the just demands and objectives of the Sikhs.

Article extracted from this publication >>  August 9, 1985